What You Should Know About Neuropathic Pain

15. August 2016 0 Comments 2 Minuten

Neuropathic pain is a pain condition that’s usually chronic. It’s usually caused by chronic, progressive nerve disease, and it can also occur as the result of injury or infection.

If you have chronic neuropathic pain, it can flare up at any time without an obvious pain-inducing event or factor. Acute neuropathic pain, while uncommon, can occur as well.

Typically, non-neuropathic pain (nociceptive pain) is due to an injury or illness. For example, if you drop a heavy book on your foot, your nervous system sends signals of pain immediately after the book hits.

With neuropathic pain, the pain isn’t typically triggered by an event or injury. Instead, the body just sends pain signals to your brain unprompted.

People with this pain condition may experience shooting, burning pain. The pain may be constant, or may occur intermittently. A feeling of numbness or a loss of sensation is common, too.

Neuropathic pain tends to get worse over time.

About 1 in 3 Americans experience chronic pain. Of those, 1 in 5 experience neuropathic pain, nerve control 911 can help you treat most nerve pain conditions.

A 2014 study estimated that as many as 10 percent of Americans experience some form of neuropathic pain.

Understanding the possible causes can help you find better treatments and ways to prevent the pain from getting worse over time.

What causes neuropathic pain?

The most common causes for neuropathic pain can be divided into four main categories: disease, injury, infection, and loss of limb.

Disease

Neuropathic pain can be a symptom or complication of several diseases and conditions. These include multiple sclerosis, multiple myeloma, and other types of cancer.

Not everyone with these conditions will experience neuropathic pain, but it can be an issue for some.

Diabetes is responsible for 30 percent of neuropathic cases, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Chronic diabetes can impact how your nerves work.

People with diabetes commonly experience loss of feeling and numbness, following by pain, burning, and stinging, in their limbs and digits.

Long-term excessive alcohol intake can cause many complications, including chronic neuropathic pain. Damage to nerves from chronic alcohol use can have long-lasting and painful effects.

Trigeminal neuralgia is a painful condition with severe neuropathic pain of one side of the face. It’s one of the more common types of neuropathic pain and it can occur without a known reason.

Lastly, cancer treatment may cause neuropathic pain. Chemotherapy and radiation can both impact the nervous system and cause unusual pain signals.